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Where to Stay in Kampot: Best Kampot Hotels & River Bungalows for Every Budget

Planning a trip to Cambodia’s favourite riverside town and wondering where to stay in Kampot? This guide shows you the best Kampot hotels, hostels, guesthouses and river bungalows for every budget and travel style.

I love Kampot. When I lived in Phnom Penh, it was my favourite place to go for a weekend away. Now, whenever I revisit Cambodia, it’s always on my list of places to return to.

Kampot should be on every traveller’s radar. Set on the river just a short drive from Cambodia’s southern coast, Kampot is clean, green, tranquil, and overall a much better alternative to Sihanoukville. The charming beach town of Kep and Koh Tonsay (Rabbit Island) are just a short drive from Kampot, giving you easy access to the coast as well.

There are plenty of things to do in Kampot – from stand-up paddle boarding, to riverside massages, pepper plantation tours, caving, and secret lakes. Kampot is brimming with beautiful colonial architecture and has an outstanding food scene, with some of the best Khmer and expat chefs in the country choosing to set up their restaurants in the peaceful river town.

There is no shortage of quality accommodations to choose from, either. I’ve stayed at a lot of different Kampot hotels over the years, and I know the pros and cons of each area well. This Kampot accommodation guide brings together that knowledge to help you choose a guesthouse, hotel or riverside bungalow that’s right for you.

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Kampot accommodation area guide

Kampot is small, but there are several separate accommodation ‘zones’ to choose from. When deciding where to stay in Kampot, consider your interests, budget, and the kind of experience you want to have. Remember that if you’re staying along the river, you’ll need to hire a motorbike or use tuk tuks (easy to do with PassApp) to get in and out of town.

In town: The central part of Kampot town is on the eastern bank of the river. It’s where you’ll find most cafes, restaurants and bars. I highly recommend staying in town if you plan on eating out a lot. If you want to be right in the thick of it, choose a hotel close to Old Market Street or the Durian Roundabout.

Thvi: Located on the opposite side of the river, the Thvi area is still close to the main centre of town, but it’s a bit quieter. You can find some really nice riverside accommodations north of the bridge, and a few beachfront resorts to the south.

Riverfront north: Most bungalows and riverside accommodation are located outside of town along the northern part of the river. If you’ve come to Kampot to relax, swim or kayak, then this is the place to stay. It’s a bit of a ways into town (up to 9km or a 20-minute tuk tuk ride), so you’ll probably end up eating most meals at your accommodation. Take this into consideration when booking. Definitely a ‘flop and drop’ location.

Tuek Chhou & Trapeang Sangkae: These satellite villages are located east of Kampot centre. Nestled amongst the rice fields and salt pans, it’s a peaceful part of town that still feels relatively untouched by tourism.

Planning a trip to Cambodia? Check out my accommodation guides for Phnom Penh and Siem Reap.

Where to stay in Kampot: Best Kampot hotels, Kampot river bungalows and Kampot hostels

Please note that distances indicated are driving times (tuk tuk, taxi or moto), and all prices quoted are in USD when booking through Agoda.

Unique accommodations in Kampot

Hotel Old Cinema

Hotel Old Cinema is one of the coolest hotels in Cambodia, if not the whole region. Boutique-style rooms and a breezy pool and restaurant area are housed inside the shell of a heritage cinema house, which pre-dates Kampot’s French colonial period. The owners have done a terrific job of bringing this piece of Kampot history back from the brink.

I loved it so much, I wrote a whole post about the property’s history and what it’s like to spend the night.

Salt Field Glamping

For something off-beat and slightly adventurous, why not spend a night under the stars in the middle of Kampot’s iconic salt flats. Spacious tents are spartan (fans, no air con) yet clean, with comfortable beds and unmatched views of the verdant rice fields from the front flap. Bathrooms are shared. The property also has a barbecue restaurant and a bicycle rental service for guests.

Samon’s Village

The striking bungalows at Samon’s Village tower high above the river, affording beautiful vistas of the town centre on the opposite bank. Beautiful deck spaces, a bar, and a lush garden that backs onto the river all inspire utter relaxation.

Furnishings are rustic (think coconut shells for shower heads), and doubles either have shared or private bathrooms. Family sized bungalows sleep up to four people – request a ground-level cabin if you have young kids. The hospitality at this family run hotel is outstanding.


Kampot hostels

Karma Traders

Bike hire, a rooftop courtyard that catches the afternoon sun and a sizeable pool are just some of the perks at Karma Traders. Choose from standard 4, 6 or 8-bed dorms with lockers and linens provided. Private doubles with en suites (either fan or AC) are also available. The location on the river not too far from town is ideal.

Yellow Sun Hostel

Bungalows on a budget. Four and 10-bed mixed dorm bungalows are set in overgrown gardens – or for something more private, there are twins with a shared bathroom and private bungalows with either a waterfront or garden outlook. The remote location makes this a classic ‘drop and flop’ option. Not that you’d ever want to leave…

Mad Monkey Hostel

If you prefer to be closer to bars and restaurants, this is the most reputable hostel in Kampot town. Mixed and single-sex dorms come in all sizes. The private doubles and twins, bright and clean, are really good value for money. Mad Monkey runs a fantastic program of day tours around Kampot, offers motorbike hire, and hosts nightly events at the hostel bar.


Budget guesthouses & hotels in Kampot

Man’Groove Kampot

These budget-friendly over-water bungalows aren’t set on the riverfront like most, but rather in a fishing village inland from the coast. The location is totally unique, and the experience of sleeping in a mangrove plantation is unforgettable. Double rooms and waterfront bungalows with shared bathrooms are basic for sure, but the location more than makes up for it. An ideal place to chill out and watch the world go by.

Daom Djah Spirit

Remote and rugged, Daom Djah Spirit prides itself on being a low-impact resort. The sleeping arrangement is familiar – either private doubles or dorm-style bungalows, all with shared bathrooms. I love that the bungalows are completely open and fitted out with huge hammocks. Some rooms open directly onto the river so you’re literally water-level. Common spaces are a cut above, with a popular bar-restaurant and plenty of comfy seating available.

Mea Culpa

With the feel of a garden bungalow but the convenience of being close to town, Mea Culpa is a Kampot favourite. Single, twin and double rooms are basic but clean. The real highlight is the outdoor space – a huge undercover sala with ample seating and leafy gardens. Having an on-site pizzeria helps as well.


Mid-range hotels in Kampot

Phoumrumduol Bungalow

The location near Kampot train station is a bit obscure, but the leafy vegetable gardens and large pool make it worth the extra bit of effort to get here from the centre of town. Family and twin bungalows (they’re more like garden cottages) come with private bathrooms and a front balcony. Bikes are available to hire, and the free breakfast is commendable.

Villa Vedici

This expansive property features houses that sleep up to 8 people and condo-style family rooms as well as standard doubles. The riverside setting is beautiful, there are are two large pools, and it’s not too far from the city centre.

Gecko Village

Hire a kayak or just lounge by the pool – this riverside resort is made for relaxing. It’s located in a popular spot, where the river loops, but it’s still quiet and engulfed in enough greenery to feel secluded.

The poolside bar and restaurant that uses ingredients grown in gardens on-site are of particular note. Concrete bungalows are a bit less atmospheric than bamboo or wood versions, but they are cool, modern and clean. A great choice for families.

Sabay Beach

Located up river on a small sandy beach, this rustic resort is a destination in itself. Choose from beachfront or riverfront bungalows, garden-facing family rooms, or my favourite, premium tree houses that make you feel as though you’re sleeping in the treetops (just be wary that the bathroom is downstairs and connected to the bedroom by a flight of steep stairs). Hammocks and rain showers are standard.


Boutique hotels in Kampot

MAKK Hotel

My go-to boutique hotel in Kampot, this unassuming property is perfectly positioned for exploring Kampot city. The balcony restaurant and rooftop garden afford nice river views. The real highlight of MAKK Hotel is the staff – they’re some of the friendliest and most helpful in town.

I’ve stayed upstairs and downstairs – I prefer the first floor rooms because they open out onto the balcony. Rooms are modern and spotlessly clean, though some of the bathrooms could do with an update.

Pippali Boutique Hotel

The huge pool shaded by a leafy tree is the hero of this boutique hotel. The location combines the best of both worlds – it’s central, but still close to the river. Rooms are clean and simple with a beach-resort feel (tiled floors, white walls). Another solid choice for couples or families.

Hotel Five.S

An open-air lobby with towering greenery greets guests at this newly opened boutique hotel. A small pool and deck area – rare for a Kampot hotel this central – are a welcome relief during summer, while the indoor-outdoor bathrooms with open-air rain showers are a very cool feature and reason enough to book a stay here. Rooms are otherwise modern and sparse; all white walls and dark wood.

The unusual profile of the hotel affords most rooms a private rooftop balcony and a view of the trees below. Family suites are big enough for a corner couch. Even internal twin rooms have a lightwell for ventilation. Friendly staff, high-powered AC and a good complimentary breakfast round-out this centrally located option.

The Columns

This French colonial heritage-style hotel has a prime location right in the heart of the Old Market area. Rooms retain some of their period features (including ceramic floor tiles), but are otherwise modestly furnished. Some deluxe rooms have their own rooftop balcony. The hotel breakfast, which comes included in the nightly rate, is highly recommended.

Kampot River Residence

A long boardwalk stretches through the rice fields to connect this property’s large, open-air dining hall with a set of riverside villas. Rooms feature wood throughout, gorgeous Khmer-style furnishings and large, modern bathrooms. All are flooded with natural light and high ceilings. Some come with a private balcony overlooking the river.

Family bungalows (1 king; 2 bunks) are particularly spacious, with a full dining table inside and a private spa outside. The river-facing side of the property is fenced off – that should give you peace of mind if you’re travelling with young kids.


Luxury hotels in Kampot

Nataya Round House Coral Bay Resort

Situated south of Kampot proper on its own private beach, Nataya is a great choice for families or anyone who wants to get in some swim time without venturing further south to the coast. Beautiful grounds and a pool overlooking the bay are the hotel’s best features.

Room decorations are a little bit stuffy and outdated. On the plus side, the hotel restaurant comes highly recommended – handy, because it’s a long trek back into town.

Le Bokor Palace

Kampot’s grandest hotel is set high in the clouds inside Bokor National Park. Le Bokor first opened in 1925, and the 2018 re-launch channels that same sort of colonial opulence.

Suites, premier and deluxe rooms all feature heritage pressed floor tiles, wooden shutters, hardwood ceilings, and ultra extravagant bathrooms with full bathtubs (I’m talking Versailles-level plush!). Free parking, buffet breakfast and breathtaking mountain views come included. When you can watch the sunset over the ocean from 1km up in the clouds, it just about justifies the steep price tag.


Kampot accommodation map


How to get to Kampot

Do you need a visa?

Most nationalities (including citizens of Australia and the UK) need a tourist visa to visit Cambodia for a period of 30 days. Use the iVisa website to check if you need a visa, and to apply and pay for an expedited visa online.

7 things to pack for Kampot

  • Swimming kit. Pack togs and a quick-dry towel if you plan on swimming in the river or partaking in any river sports. A long-sleeved rashie (sun shirt) is also a good idea if you have sensitive skin.
  • A reusable water bottle. Absolutely essential in Cambodia for minimising plastic waste and staying hydrated. I love my S’Well water bottle – it’s vacuum insulated to keep water icy cold for the whole day, and it doesn’t sweat. If you like your mango smoothies, pack a reusable smoothie cup as well.
  • Rehydration tablets or sachets. At the end of a long day bike riding or exploring temples, your body will be crying out for electrolytes (believe me!). I prefer Hydralyte tablets because they come in a handy tube. If you forget to bring some from home, the Double D brand is sold at most pharmacies and grocery stores in Cambodia.
  • Rain jacket and travel umbrella for the wet season. Wet season is my favourite time to travel in Cambodia because the countryside is so verdant. Downpours come out of nowhere, so it’s essential to have a rain jacket with you at all times (I love the packable rain jackets by Lomon for women and EZRUN for men). I also carry a travel umbrella in case it’s too hot and steamy to wear a jacket. This one is UPF 50+, making it great for sun cover as well.
  • A sturdy day pack. An anti-theft backpack is particularly good for using in Cambodian cities. Opt for a minimalist backpack that doesn’t stand out.
  • Cambodia guide book. I prefer Lonely Planet’s dedicated Cambodia guidebook or regional guidebook that also covers Laos, Vietnam and Northern Thailand.

More Cambodia travel resources

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